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Summer Winter

What do you do with moguls in the summer? Are they manmade?

Moguls are formed by skiers on virtually all ski trails that are not mechanically flattened with grooming equipment. They organize spontaneously as skiers move along a ski run, kicking up snow behind them as they turn. The kicked-up snow forms into piles, which eventually turn into moguls.

 

Check out this time lapse video of how moguls actually move uphill over time!
By |2020-12-29T22:40:16-07:00December 29th, 2020 10:40 pm||0 Comments

I’ve never been skiing / snowboarding. What should I wear?

Because of changing weather conditions, and depending upon your level of activity, layering clothes is recommended. Be aware that MORE is not necessarily better, and in many cases wearing too much clothing can be physically limiting. Follow these guidelines:

 

  1. Start with a comfortable, breatheable base layer like thermal underwear, merino wool, etc.
  2. Wear only one thin pair of socks (merino wool is optimal since it wicks moisture away from your feet and is very warm). This is important! Wearing thick, bulky socks or multiple pairs of socks restricts circulation, creates pressure points and does not allow your feet to breathe.
  3. If it is especially cold, you can add a sweater or fleece over your base layer. Wear something that is easy to shed if the sun comes out and warms things up.
  4. Waterproof outerwear (pants & jackets), especially for beginners who tend to fall a lot. Jeans and sweatpants get wet quickly in snow and will ice up. A ski or snowboard lesson is a lot more fun when a person is warm and dry!
  5. Waterproof gloves or mittens will keep your fingers toasty warm. Knit gloves will get wet after falling only a couple of times, not so fun. Be sure your children have waterproof gloves/mittens before their lesson!
  6. Goggles or UV protective sunglasses/eyewear. Snow is a natural reflector of sunlight. Without UV protection your eyes (cornea) can get a “sunburn” which feels scratchy and uncomfortable. Like skin, repeated cornea burns can cause long term damage. So take care of your eyes – wear sunglasses!
  7. Don’t forget a warm beanie, hat or helmet! There is much debate out there as to the value of wearing a helmet or not, and the myth that 80% of your body heat will escape through your head has been debunked. Regardless, wearing a helmet or a hat will keep your head warmer. There’s a lot to be said about having a warm head when it’s snowing outside, so be prepared and bring your helmet, hat or beanie!
By |2020-12-29T21:54:48-07:00December 29th, 2020 9:54 pm||0 Comments

What is the Responsibility Code?

Skiing and snowboarding can be enjoyed in many ways. At areas, you may see people using alpine skis, snowboards, telemark skis, cross country skis, and other specialized equipment, such as that used by people with disabilities. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below, and share with other skiers and riders the responsibility for a great skiing experience.

  • Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  • People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  • Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  • Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  • Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

Know the code. It’s your responsibility.

*Note: This is a partial list. Be safety conscious.

The National Ski Areas Association has put together a “Know the Code” video; view it below.

By |2020-12-29T22:40:29-07:00December 24th, 2020 4:01 pm|, |0 Comments

My spouse has never been skiing/snowboarding. Should I teach them?

Many couples, families and friends prefer to leave the lessons to the pros.

 

Our winter sports staff receives continuous training and certifications, keeping up with the most current equipment and PSAI | AASI lesson standards. There is a progression to teaching a new student on the snow that builds gradually upon the most basic skills.

 

As students grasp the concepts needed to master the beginner hill, many other factors come into play that are determined by movement analysis – subtleties your pro instructor has been trained to detect that most novice skiers and snowboarders are unaware of.

 

And finally, our pros take the safety of our guests seriously, integrating the Skier | Snowboarder Responsibility Code into the lesson. Safety + Fun = Learning!
By |2020-12-29T22:41:34-07:00December 24th, 2020 3:57 pm|, |0 Comments
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